These suggestions may help you to reduce risk in experiencing a non-consensual sexual act.

Suggestions to Avoid Committing or Becoming a Victim of a Non-Consensual Sexual Act:

  • Make any limits known as early as possible.
  • Tell a sexual aggressor “NO” clearly and firmly.
  • Try to remove yourself from the physical presence of a sexual aggressor.
  • Find someone nearby and ask for help.
  • Take affirmative responsibility for your alcohol intake/drug use and acknowledge that alcohol/drugs lower your sexual inhibitions and may make you vulnerable to someone who views a drunk or high person as a sexual opportunity.
  • Take care of your friends and ask that they take care of you. A real friend will challenge you if you are about to make a mistake. Respect them when they do.

If you find yourself in the position of being the initiator of sexual behavior, you owe sexual respect to your potential partner. These suggestions may help you to reduce your risk for being accused of sexual misconduct:

  • Clearly communicate your intentions to your sexual partner and give them a chance to clearly relate their intentions to you.
  • Understand and respect personal boundaries.
  • DON’T MAKE ASSUMPTIONS about consent; about someone’s sexual availability; about whether they are attracted to you; about how far you can go or about whether they are physically and/or mentally able to consent. If there are any questions or ambiguity then you DO NOT have consent.
  • Mixed messages from your partner are a clear indication that you should stop, defuse any sexual tension and communicate better. You may be misreading them. They may not have figured out how far they want to go with you yet. You must respect the timeline for sexual behaviors with which they are comfortable.
  • Don’t take advantage of someone’s drunkenness or drugged state, even if they did it to themselves.
  • Realize that your potential partner could be intimidated by you, or fearful. You may have a power advantage simply because of your gender or size. Don’t abuse that power.
  • Understand that consent to some form of sexual behavior does not automatically imply consent to any other forms of sexual behavior.

Silence and passivity cannot be interpreted as an indication of consent. Read your potential partner carefully, paying attention to verbal and non-verbal communication and body language.

Bystander Intervention

Bystanders are individuals who witness emergencies, criminal events or situations that could lead to criminal events and by their presence may have the opportunity to:

  • Provide assistance
  • Do nothing
  • Contribute to the negative behavior

Bystander Tips

What should I do if I see it?

  • Name or acknowledge an offense
  • Point to the “elephant in the room”
  • Interrupt the behavior
  • Publicly support an aggrieved person
  • Use body language to show disapproval
  • Use humor (with care)
  • Encourage dialogue
  • Help calm strong feelings
  • Call for help

*Remember to always keep your safety in mind*

If you experience Sexual Misconduct/Harassment to you or someone you know, or you suspect it is happening, you have an obligation to REPORT IT!

Report and Incident

Obligation to Report

As a faculty or staff member of PPCC, you have an obligation to report any incidents of alleged sexual harassment that you may witness or that may be reported to you within 24 hours. You should report these situations to the Title IX Coordinator, Carlton Brooks, Executive Director of Human Resource Services.

TITLE IX COORDINATOR HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR
Janell Oberlander Kim Bense
2801 W 9th Street 500 Kennedy Dr., McLaughlin Bldg #215
Craig, CO 81625 Rangely, CO 81648
(970) 824-1102 (970) 675-3335
Janell Oberlander Kim Bense

You may also contact the Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education, Region VIII, Federal Office Building, 1244 North Speer Boulevard, Suite 310, Denver, CO 80204, telephone (303) 844-3417.